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Please feel free to contact us by shooting us an email with this form or calling us at 202.375.7760, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm (ET). 

 

1200 18th St NW, Ste 700
Washington, DC, 20036
United States

(202) 375.7760

MobilizeGreen is a DC-based national non-profit that serves as a catalyst in preparing the next generation of environmental leaders.  MobilizeGreen’s mission is to jump-start green careers for under-represented youth.  

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blog

Environmentally-minded Video Games

Will Allen-DuPraw

One of the biggest questions in the green community is how to engage and get Millennials excited about sustainability and conservation.  For me, video games come to mind almost immediately.  Below I review three environmentally-minded video games because I believe that video games can and should be an effective engagement strategy to shape the way young people think about the environment.  Here are 3 reasons why:

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Rain Gardens: A Sustainable Alternative to Grass Lawns

Will Allen-DuPraw

One of the most common mantras of the environmental sustainability movement is “think globally, act locally.”  Well it doesn’t get much more local than your own front yard.  While the idea of having a lush grass lawn may play well in our heads, in reality grass lawns are a major contributor to water waste.  Most lawns are made of grass that is not native to its environment and therefore needs massive amounts of water to stay green and healthy.

However, there is a sustainable alternative to the grass lawn called a “rain garden.” A rain garden is a shallow depression in the lawn in which native floodplain species are planted.  These species are far less demanding than the typical species of grass used in most lawns and require far less upkeep after the initial installation.  In the video below, Devki Desai, a civil engineering PhD student at the University of Michigan’s Blue Lab explains more about rain gardens and shows you how to make one in your own lawn.  


5 Inspiring TED Talks about Sustainability You Should See

Leah Allen

MobilizeGreen values passion, drive, and ingenuity above all else, and that's exactly what we see in our five favorite sustainability TED Talks from around the world:

1. Greening the Ghetto  - Majora Carter

As a native resident of the Bronx, Majora Carter speaks with passion about the environmental issues that affect her Bronx neighborhood and many other low-income urban areas just like it.  The Bronx in particular is plagued with multiple sewage treatment plants, power plants, and other polluting industries, and is also burdened with handling over 40% of the total waste of the New York City’s waste.  

2. What’s Wrong with our Food System – Birke Baehr

At 11 years-old Birke Baehr has a solid start on a career in sustainable agriculture. He  encourages people to think locally, choose organic, and know your farmer and know your food.  We are particularly excited about Birke's enthusiasm and drive to help change the planet.

3. How the Oceans Can Clean Themselves - Boyan Slat

19-year-old innovator Boyan Slat talks about his solution to getting rid of plastic trash polluting our water.  Using solar powered boats and the motion of ocean currents for energy, Slat says that the world’s oceans can be cleaned of plastic waste in just five years.  Visit http://www.theoceancleanup.com/ for more information on what you can do on this issue.

4. Using Nature’s Genius in Architecture - Michael Pawlyn

Architect Michael Pawlyn is big on the idea of biomimicry, which looks to nature for inspiration for sustainable solutions to a range of problems.   Pawlyn focuses on the idea of the “closed loop,” a system in which the waste from one step serves as the fuel for another until the process comes full circle to eliminate all actual waste.  Learn more about his work at http://www.exploration-architecture.com/ .

5.  A Drone's-Eye View of Conservation - Lian Pin Koh

Ecologist Lian Pin Koh looks at the use of drones in a new way.  Koh works in wildlife conservation in Southeast Asia and has been developing versatile drones that can be used to protect endangered species or to help biologists collect key data that can promote conservation.  Lian and his team admit they are basically boys playing with model airplanes, but we believe the work they are doing has implications for a sustainable future.   


Millennials, Diversity, and Green: Why They Matter for Our Economic Future

Leah Allen

Get ready.  Change is coming, ready or not.

Today's young people are tomorrow's workforce. They will drive economic growth in America and abroad.  There are 80 million Millennials, the largest generation ever. Born between 1980 and 1993, “one in every three employees in the U.S. will be a millennial by next year, and by 2025 they will become 75 percent of the global workforce,” according to Forbes.  Young people are our future leaders.  

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